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The relationship and interaction of menstrual and generative function and depressive disorders in women

https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2018-2-45-51

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Abstract

Objective: to study of the individual aspects of the relationship and interaction of menstrual and generative function and depressive disorders in women.

Patients and methods. 120 women aged 18–65 years with recurrent depressive disorder (RDD) who had experienced at least two depressive episodes (a study group) and 120 mentally healthy women of the same age (a control group) were clinically examined using a specially designed map with subsequent statistical processing of the findings.

Results and discussion. In 71.7% of women, depression manifests itself during hormonal rearrangement periods (puberty, postpartum, and menopause). 65.0% of women with RDD have premenstrual syndrome (PMS), the pattern of which shows depressive symptoms. Depression affects menstrual function: the later onset and irregularity of menstruation, the earlier restoration of menstrual function after childbirth, and the earlier onset of premenopause, which has an adverse impact on generative function (a reduction in the number of pregnancies, births, and babies). Depression, the onset of which is observed during puberty, exerts the most malignant effect on menstrual and generative function. Overall, depressive patients are less socially and family-friendly than healthy women. Menstrual and generative function and adaptation minimally suffer in women with postmenopausal depression.

Conclusion. The onset of depressive disorders is associated with the hormonal rearrangement periods. The presence of depressive symptoms in the pattern of PMS is a prognostic sign of future depression or indicates partial remission. At the same time, menstrual function is impaired in women suffering from RDD, which along with psychic manifestations of depression (a decrease in sexual drive and contacts, as well as anesthesia of feelings, etc.) leads to infertility. 

About the Authors

N. A. Tyuvina
I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

Contact: Nina Arkadyevna Tyuvina

Department of Psychiatry and Narcology 

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119021 



E. O. Voronina
I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

Department of Psychiatry and Narcology 

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119021 



V. V. Balabanova
I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

Department of Psychiatry and Narcology 

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119021 



E. M. Goncharova
I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

Department of Psychiatry and Narcology 

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119021 



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For citation:


Tyuvina N.A., Voronina E.O., Balabanova V.V., Goncharova E.M. The relationship and interaction of menstrual and generative function and depressive disorders in women. Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Psychosomatics. 2018;10(2):45-51. (In Russ.) https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2018-2-45-51

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ISSN 2074-2711 (Print)
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