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USE OF AN INFRA-LOW FREQUENCY EEG BIOLOGICAL FEEDBACK TECHNIQUE IN THE COMPREHENSIVE REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH A DECREASED LEVEL OF CONSCIOUSNESS

https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2016-4-10-13

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Abstract

A protocol for EEG biological feedback (BFB) at infra-low frequencies (<0.01 Hz) corresponding to those of the brain default mode network has been devised in recent years.

Objective: to evaluate the therapeutic features of an EEG BFB technique in the rehabilitation of patients with a decreased level of consciousness.

Patients and methods. The study included 11 patients with a decreased consciousness level (Glasgow coma scores of 7.4±2.5).  The patients were examined using the specialized clinical scales before and every 3 weeks during BFB therapy (5 BFB sessions per week).

Results. According to the neuropsychological scales, the patients' level of consciousness and mental activity were noted to become obviously increased just after 3 weeks of therapy, which was observed until the neurorehabilitation course was completed.

Conclusion. The minimally conscious patients using EEG BFB showed a significant clinical improvement. The infra-low frequency EEG BFB method deserves attention as a promising tool for increasing the patients' level of consciousness in accessible form.

About the Authors

M. V. Shendyapina
Treatment and Rehabilitation Center
Russian Federation

Maria Valentinovna Shendyapina.

3, Ivankovskoe Shosse, Moscow, 125367, maria-shendyapina@yandex.ru



S. A. Kazymaev
Treatment and Rehabilitation Center
Russian Federation
3, Ivankovskoe Shosse, Moscow, 125367


T. V. Shapovalenko
Treatment and Rehabilitation Center
Russian Federation
3, Ivankovskoe Shosse, Moscow, 125367


K. V. Lyadov
Treatment and Rehabilitation Center
Russian Federation
3, Ivankovskoe Shosse, Moscow, 125367


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For citation:


Shendyapina M.V., Kazymaev S.A., Shapovalenko T.V., Lyadov K.V. USE OF AN INFRA-LOW FREQUENCY EEG BIOLOGICAL FEEDBACK TECHNIQUE IN THE COMPREHENSIVE REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH A DECREASED LEVEL OF CONSCIOUSNESS. Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Psychosomatics. 2016;8(4):10-13. (In Russ.) https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2016-4-10-13

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ISSN 2074-2711 (Print)
ISSN 2310-1342 (Online)