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Postpartum depression — risk factors, clinical and treatment aspects

https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2021-4-75-80

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Abstract

Objective: to analyze the psychopathological structure, risk factors and tretment of depressive disorders in women in the postpartum period.

Patients and methods. A prospective cohort study included 150 women in the postpartum period (0-3 days after birth), aged 18 to 41 years, with follow-up every two weeks for six months. The evaluation included clinical interviews, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the 17-item Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale.

Results and discussion. 11.3% of women developed depression within six weeks after childbirth. Among them, 94.2% presented with mild depression, and 5.8% - moderate. Risk factors associated with postpartum depression included: periods of low mood and anxiety before and during the current pregnancy, traumatic situations during pregnancy, unwanted pregnancy, pathology of pregnancy and childbirth, cesarean section, perinatal status, lack of breastfeeding. All women with postpartum depression were treated with rational-emotive and cognitive-behavioral therapy. A short course of pharmacotherapy was prescribed to 17.6% of them to correct insomnia and anxiety symptoms. Psychotherapy was highly efficient in the treatment of postpartum affective disorders.

Conclusion. The postpartum depression prevalence was 11.3%. The severity of postpartum depression was predominantly mild, and the symptoms regressed during treatment within five months in all women.

About the Authors

M. A. Makarova
Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

Maria Aleksandrovna Makarova.

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119021.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



Yu. G. Tikhonova
Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119991.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



T. I. Avdeeva
Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119991.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



I. V. Ignatko
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

4, acad. Oparina St., Moscow 117997.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



M. A. Kinkulkina
Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), Ministry of Health of Russia
Russian Federation

11, Rossolimo St., Build. 9, Moscow 119991.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



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For citation:


Makarova M.A., Tikhonova Yu.G., Avdeeva T.I., Ignatko I.V., Kinkulkina M.A. Postpartum depression — risk factors, clinical and treatment aspects. Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Psychosomatics. 2021;13(4):75-80. (In Russ.) https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2021-4-75-80

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ISSN 2074-2711 (Print)
ISSN 2310-1342 (Online)