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Workplace stress and cognitive functions (a population based study of adults aged 25—44 years)

https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2021-4-30-36

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Abstract

Objective: to investigate the effect of workplace stress on cognitive functions of younger men and women (25—44 years) in an open population of Novosibirsk.

Patients and methods. The study included a representative sample of Novosibirsk population aged 25—44 years (2013—2016 screening) within the budgetary theme №0541-2014-0004. We screened individuals aged 25—44years: 463 men, mean age 35.94±5.957years, and 546 women, mean age 36.17±5.997 years. Association of workplace stress with cognitive functions were assessed with standardized questions such as: «Has your specialty changed over the past 12 years?», «Do you like your job?» and «How do you rate your work responsibility over the past 12 months?». Cognitive evaluation during screening period included: A.R. Luria 10-words learning task (immediate and delayed recall), Burdon's test, exclusion of concepts «5th extra», animal naming test.

Results and discussion. We observed a decrease in semantic associations number among the respondents who did not change their occupation over the past year and among respondents who assess their work responsibility as «low». Verbal logical reasoning was lower in the respondents who assumed that they «did not like» or «did not like at all» their job and also assessed their work responsibility as «low». Auditory verbal shortterm memory, long-term memory, memorization productivity, and attention were worse in the participants who had either «insignificant» or «average» work responsibility.

Conclusion. Younger adults experiencing workplace stress have a decrease in cognitive functions.

About the Authors

V. V. Gafarov
Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch, Federal Research Center «Research Institute of Cytology and Genetics», Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences; Collaborative Laboratory of Cardiovascular Diseases Epidemiology
Russian Federation

Valery Vasilyevich Gafarov.

175/1, Boris Bogatkov St., Novosibirsk 630089.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



A. V. Sukhanov
Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch, Federal Research Center «Research Institute of Cytology and Genetics», Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences
Russian Federation

175/1, Boris Bogatkov St., Novosibirsk 630089.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



E. A. Gromova
Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch, Federal Research Center «Research Institute of Cytology and Genetics», Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences; Collaborative Laboratory of Cardiovascular Diseases Epidemiology
Russian Federation

175/1, Boris Bogatkov St., Novosibirsk 630089.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



D. O. Panov
Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch, Federal Research Center «Research Institute of Cytology and Genetics», Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences; Collaborative Laboratory of Cardiovascular Diseases Epidemiology
Russian Federation

175/1, Boris Bogatkov St., Novosibirsk 630089.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



D. V. Denisova
Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch, Federal Research Center «Research Institute of Cytology and Genetics», Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences
Russian Federation

175/1, Boris Bogatkov St., Novosibirsk 630089.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



I. V. Gagulin
Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch, Federal Research Center «Research Institute of Cytology and Genetics», Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences; Collaborative Laboratory of Cardiovascular Diseases Epidemiology
Russian Federation

175/1, Boris Bogatkov St., Novosibirsk 630089.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



A. V. Gafarova
Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch, Federal Research Center «Research Institute of Cytology and Genetics», Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences; Collaborative Laboratory of Cardiovascular Diseases Epidemiology
Russian Federation

175/1, Boris Bogatkov St., Novosibirsk 630089.


Competing Interests:

There are no conflicts of interest.



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For citation:


Gafarov V.V., Sukhanov A.V., Gromova E.A., Panov D.O., Denisova D.V., Gagulin I.V., Gafarova A.V. Workplace stress and cognitive functions (a population based study of adults aged 25—44 years). Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Psychosomatics. 2021;13(4):30-36. https://doi.org/10.14412/2074-2711-2021-4-30-36

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ISSN 2074-2711 (Print)
ISSN 2310-1342 (Online)